European Network for Intergenerational Learning (ENIL), Second Conference

24-26th October, 2012, Nuremberg, Germany


Over 80 participants from seventeen European countries, including ECA Trustee Judith Robinson, gathered for the ENIL conference at the Institut fur Padagogik und Schulpsychologie in Nuremberg to focus on the theme of TOWARDS ACTIVE AGEING AND INTERGENERATIONAL SOLIDARITY.


The conference was a rich mixture of guest speakers presenting the importance of active ageing and future plans to encourage this to happen easily, workshops about projects for intergenerational learning (IGL) and fine examples of active ageing, as well as assessment and validation in a mixed-aged environment. A fascinating tour of the Memorium Nuremberg Trials was also included.


One key research report by Dr. Julia Franz was an analysis of the different classifications of intergenerational learning (including a discussion of “what is a generation?”!) which could be a basis for identifying IGL projects for ENIL in the future. Participants welcomed this research because it started to move IGL from “something that feels good, feels right” to a clearer classification for identifying the different types of IGL activities.


Many of the speakers, and participants too, expressed the feeling that there were too many intergenerational learning projects between the very old and the very young, and multi-age learning could be a focus for the future.


Something Positive for a Change – assessment using Appreciative Inquiry.


Appreciative Inquiry (AI), the study of what gives life to human systems when they are at their best, has often been used in project assessment, including intergenerational learning. Judith presented a workshop at the conference on using AI in assessment.


For the ECA this is not new. In one of its previous European projects, TEACh (Teaching European Active Citizenship) the final assessment was carried out using Appreciative Inquiry – AI practitioners use the term “valuation” rather than “evaluation” because by focussing on what is valued, a wealth of creative ideas is cultivated for the future.


Judith Robinson


Date Added: October 30th 2012